Monday, June 3 – 7, 2024

Ready to Eat Frogs?

Mark Twain once said that if you have to eat a live frog, do it first thing in the morning. Mark Twain once said that if you have to eat a live frog, do it first thing in the morning.

Join the Free frog-A-Day Challenge

 

“What’s the Bias?” Workshop

A 90-minute gamified, collaborative learning experience to make invisible biases, visible. You can’t unsee biases once you play.

When we ignore our biases, we might not see situations or people as they really are. This can make it hard for us to judge things fairly or understand them correctly.

➔ We Let Good Chances Slip By:
If we let biases control us, we might miss out on cool opportunities or chances to grow.

➔ We Make Bad Choices:
If we don’t see our biases, we might make choices that aren’t good for us or don’t make different opinions.

➔ We Miss Out on New Ideas:
If we’re stuck in our ways because of biases, we might not learn new things or hear different opinions.

Join us Mon. June 3rd | 8:00 – 8:25 am Pacific

frog-A-Day Challenge

 

Eat-A-Frog Reviews

Align With the Customer: Show empathy and agreement with their situation to establish trust and rapport. Make it clear you understand their needs.

Jessica

Kimlyn

I’ve learned that when I stop generating possibilities in my decision process, I know to question where I’m stuck…for me it’s usually the either/or bias, the information bias, or the zero-risk bias. I can get back on track with speed and clarity.

Nicole

Playing the bias game was eye-opening. It showed me how sneaky biases can be, hiding in plain sight. Now, I can spot them quickly, helping me make better decisions.

Terry

“The bias game has taught me that awareness is key. Now that I can identify my go-to biases, I feel more in control of my decisions and less influenced by unconscious biases.”

Jeremiah

“After playing ‘What’s the Bias?’ I’ve become more conscious of my ‘either/or’ bias. It’s been eye-opening to see how this bias limited my thinking. Now I make sure I’m exploring a wider range of possibilities in my decisions.”